Last edited by Yomi
Friday, November 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan found in the catalog.

Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan

Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Or. (333 S.W. First Ave., P.O. Box 3890, Portland 97208) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Spotted owl -- Habitat -- Northwest, Pacific,
  • Spotted owl -- Monitoring -- Northwest, Pacific

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJoseph Lint ... [et al.]
    SeriesGeneral technical report PNW-GTR -- 440, General technical report PNW -- 440
    ContributionsLint, Joseph, Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.), United States. Bureau of Land Management, Geological Survey (U.S.). Biological Resources Division
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination43 p.
    Number of Pages43
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14497364M
    OCLC/WorldCa41595613

      Northern Spotted Owl & the Northwest Forest Plan The Northern Spotted Owl is a rare raptor often associated with the complex features and closed canopy of mature or old-growth forests. Since it is associated with older forests, the owl serves as an “indicator species”—its presence indicates that the forest is healthy and functioning properly. Northern spotted owls are considered an indicator species that helps gauge the ecological health of forest habitat. Through long-term monitoring biologists study owl populations in San Francisco Bay Area national parks and on nearby public lands. Northern Spotted Owl Recovery Plans and Critical Habitat Designation The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) released its Final Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl on J Under the terms of a Court order from the D.C. District Court, FWS will also revise its Critical Habitat Designation for the spotted owl.


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Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan Download PDF EPUB FB2

2 Northern Spotted Owl Effectiveness Monitoring Annual Summary Report for Executive Summary The ninth consecutive year of monitoring northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) populations under the Northwest Forest Plan was completed in Inthe comprehensive Northwest Forest Plan ('the Plan') was initiated to end the impasse over management of federal forest land in the Pacific Northwest within the range of the northern spotted owl.

The Plan Record of Decision and Standards and Guidelines used an innovative approach based on ecosystem and watershed management. Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan book forest plan.

1 online resource (43 p.) (OCoLC) Microfiche: Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan. 1 microfiche (OCoLC) Online version: Lint, Joseph.

Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the Northwest. This report describes options for effectiveness monitoring of long-term status and trends of the northern spotted owl to evaluate the success of the Northwest Forest Plan in arresting downward.

Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the Northwest Forest Plan. 43 p. (DLC) (OCoLC) Microfiche: Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the northwest forest plan.

1 microfiche (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource. The spotted owl came to symbolize the need for strong protections for forest-dwellers and their habitat, leading to the groundbreaking Northwest Forest Plan in The Northwest Forest Plan also affirmed the importance of sustainable timber harvest, a mainstay for people in this region for more than a century.

The Northwest Forest Plan set up. Late-Successional Forests and Northern Spotted Owls: How Effective is the Northwest Forest Plan. Miles Hemstrom and Martin G.

Raphael paper describes the late-successional and old-growth forest and the northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plans for the Northwest Forest Plan. Right now, not far from where I sit writing in Seattle, northern spotted owl pairs in the old-growth forests of the Northwest have hatched their young and are tending to their brood.

Breeding females are sitting on their nests in the cavities of broken top trees, warming and protecting their new owlets from predation, while their partners hunt and deliver prey to the nest.

They provide a year synthesis of science focused on the ecology, conservation, and management of northern spotted owls and review expectations for conserving northern spotted owls under the Northwest Forest Plan. Authors review recent information on the status and trends of spotted owl populations and suitable forest, effects of interactions with barred.

others. The Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Revised Recovery Plan) does not necessarily represent the view or official position of any individual or organization—other than that of the Service—involved in its development. Although the northern spotted owl is a subspecies of spotted owl,File Size: 2MB.

Northwest forests, spotted owls at risk The Obama administration has put science back into play. But two decades after a plan to save NW forests, distractions keep the focus off owl and habitat Author: Daniel Jack Chasan. Northwest Forest Plan's shortcomings.

The Northwest Forest Plan was a compromise that did not go far enough to protect the region's remaining old-growth forests, sensitive wildlife species, or, arguably, a sustainable economy.

The Plan allows logging and road building in ecologically critical areas, across all land use allocations. Asthe basis of the Nortlzwest Forest Plan, "no species in the United States a greater impact on land-use planning at the landscape scale". Inthe Northwest Forest Plan was adopted by the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture to provide for “Management of Habitat for Late-Successional and Old-Growth Forest Species Within the Range of the Northern Spotted Owl.” This plan, which was a set of standards and guidelines, was implemented across 26 forests in the Pacific.

Northern spotted owls are one of three subspecies of spotted owls. The other two are the Mexican spotted owl and the California spotted owl.

Each of these owls is brown with white spots, but the northern spotted owl is the darkest brown with the smallest spots and has darker facial disks (the feathers surrounding the eyes). History. The Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) is a series of federal policies and guidelines governing land use on federal lands in the Pacific Northwest region of the United covers 10 million hectares within Western Oregon and Washington as well as a small part of Northern California.

The NWFP was adopted in by the Clinton administration as the outcome of a. Long-Term Population Monitoring of Northern Spotted Owls: Recent Results and Implications for the Northwest Forest Plan Steven H. Ackers Most of the other chapters in this book discuss the broad changes in forest management, economics, and public percep-tions of the values and uses of Pacific Northwest (PNW) forests.

Northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plan for the Northwest Forest Plan. Gen. Tech. -GTR Portland, OR: Pacific Northwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (USFWS ; hereafter “Revised Recovery Plan”) recommends that land managers: (1) conserve older forest, high-value habitat, and areas occupied by northern spotted owls; and (2) actively manage forests to restore ecosystem health in many parts of the species' range.

Raymond J. Davis, Northern Spotted Owl Monitoring Module Leader, Northwest Forest Plan Interagency Monitoring Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 3DFL¿F 1RUWKZHVW 5HJLRQ 1: 6WHZDUW 3DUNZD\ 5RVHEXUJ 25 Katie M. Dugger DVVRFLDWH SURIHVVRU 6HQLRU 5HVHDUFK 'HSDUWPHQW RI)LVKHULHV DQG:LOGOLIH.

The debate over the spotted owl played across newspapers across the country and led to hostilities in many of the Pacific Northwest's small towns. Though the issues were in fact far more complex, many reports pitched the controversy as a struggle between loggers' jobs and protection of the owls' ancient forest habitat.

The owl’s protected status in led to the Clinton Administration’s Northwest Forest plan, four years later. Geisinger says that plan promised a balance of timber production and.

The old-growth forests of the Pacific Northwest are some of North America’s most amazing natural assets. The legacy of these forests was called to the forefront more than 20 years ago when the northern spotted owl was listed under the Endangered Species Act as a threatened species in Washington, Oregon, and California.

DNR’s Trust Lands Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) covers state forestlands managed by DNR within the range of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina).

This includes million acres of state trust lands west of the Cascade Mountains and on the eastern slopes of the Cascades. One of the primary conservation strategies in the HCP is protecting and enhancing the. The Spotted Owl occurs in the Pacific Northwest region of North America from northern California to British Columbia.

The southwest mainland portion of British Columbia is the northern extent of the owl's range. British Columbia announced its Spotted Owl Recovery Action Plan based on the work of the Canadian Spotted Owl Recovery Team.

The. BCRP provided funding for the Spotted Owl inventory and monitoring project to be conducted within the Bridge, Seton and Stave* watersheds. *The Stave Lake watershed was originally proposed yet could not be conducted due to access issues. The spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) is a species of true is a resident species of old-growth forests in western North America, where it nests in tree hollows, old bird of prey nests, or rock crevices.

Nests can be between 12 and 60 metres (39 and ft) high and usually contain two eggs (though some contain as many as four). It is a nocturnal owl, which feeds on small Class: Aves. within the range of the northern spotted owl. Background/Purpose and Need Inthe Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service adopted standards and guidelines for the management of habitat for late-successional and old-growth forest related species within the range of the northern spotted owl, commonly known as the Northwest Forest Plan.

Communicate to the public the USFWS guidelines pertaining to activities such as noise disturbance and construction near Spotted Owl habitat during the nesting season (February 1st to July 9th).

Scientists. Continue and expand monitoring of Spotted Owl and Barred Owl populations on public lands. Current research is ongoing in Marin County but. The plan would provide timber companies incentives to create potential spotted owl habitat. Officials from the Forest Service and from the Bureau of Land Management, which oversee logging on Author: William Yardley.

The Northern Spotted Owl - An Oregon View tells the story of a battle to save the forests in a backdrop of economic troubles in the Pacific Northwest. "The economy in the Pacific Northwest is a disaster," says the author. In Januarynewspapers in Portland and Salem, Oregon, featured reports on the deplorable financial situation in state and local governments.2/5(1).

Owl Ecology in Marin County, California: Vital indicators of diversity, Northern Spotted Owls have been called an “indicator” species because their presence in a forest is a gauge of the ecological health of the habitat.

When an area is suitable for the Spotted Owl then it is able to support a diversity of other plants and animals. northern!flying!squirrels,!red!tree!voles!and!woodrats;which!can!only!be!found!in!old.

growth!forests.!!. Like!mostowls,!spotted!owls!are!nocturnal!and!are File Size: 2MB. NORTHERN SPOTTED OWL HABITAT CONSERVATION PLAN. When the northern spotted owl was listed as a threatened species under the. Federal Endangered Species Act init brought into sharp focus the potential conflict.

between timber operations and wildlife protection in. Although northern spotted owl populations have continued to drop, the Bush administration ramped up attacks on the owl by releasing a recovery plan that proposed less habitat protection than the science-based Northwest Forest Plan, as well as by slashing more than a million acres of critical habitat for the owl.

The northern spotted owl is a threatened species native to the old-growth cloud forests of the province of British Columbia, Canada, and the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, and California. (This breathtaking photograph was taken in Northern California's redwood forest in ) In the s, the owl became a symbol of the bitter conflict between conservation efforts and.

The Northern Spotted Owl has thick feathers to insulate it in the cold of the northwest. It also has a strong beak for hunting its prey. Owls can also see in the dark very well but don't use echolocation to find food.

They also have special asymmetrical. The Northwest Economic Adjustment Initiative is the segment of the President's forest plan aimed at assisting the economic transition in the Pacific Northwest. The controversy between industry and environmental groups over the past several years has centered on forest management issues, with less attention to the subsequent and related economic.

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Northern spotted owl populations are declining in all parts of their range in the Pacific Northwest, according to research published in The Condor.

Based on data from 11 study areas across Washington, Oregon and northern California, a rangewide decline of nearly 4 percent per year was estimated from to white spots, for which this attractive owl is named.

The Northern Spotted Owl has large, round facial discs with dark outer rims, dark brown eyes and a yellowish-green bill. In British Columbia, the Northern Spotted Owl is most likely to be con-fused with its close relative, the slight-ly larger Barred Owl.

These species are. Sensitive sites include areas actively used by bald eagles, osprey, northern spotted owl and other species identified as sensitive, threatened, or endangered. Resources. Northern Spotted Owl abandonment request form Bald Eagle monitoring report Osprey; Private Landowners Can Help Make the Difference for Coastal Coho.The listing of the spotted owl would be the catalyst for a new federal land management system that would preserve forests over years old and diminish returns for the timber industry.

The Northwest Forest Plan, introduced inwould allocate over 20 million acres of federal forest land for reserves to restore the diminishing species.Humboldt Redwood Company Northern Spotted Owl Annual Report Page 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The year was the sixteenth year of surveys and monitoring under the Northern Spotted Owl Conservation Plan (Habitat Conservation Plan or HCP §) of the former Pacific Lumber Company (PALCO), now Humboldt Redwood Company (HRC) HCP.